@daisy_wakefield / Instagram

A student is tackling period poverty in the best way at her university

Daisy used her student loan after her university failed to act upon period poverty.

18 Apr 2019

It's no secret that period poverty is a rising issue within the UK, and despite the announcement of free sanitary products for primary and secondary schools, the lack of funding behind making periods an easier time for all women is, quite frankly, worrying.

And for university students, it's no different. Drawing and Print student, Daisy Wakefield from the University of West England, noticed the issue of fellow students being unable to afford proper sanitary products and decided to act when her Bristol-based university failed to.

Using £100 of her own student loan, Daisy helped to provide free tampons for women across all campuses, even adding her own touch by designing personalised packaging across the 40 boxes.

View this post on Instagram

FREE SANITARY PRODUCTS FOR ALL!!! After many emails saying “I’ll get back to you” or “I’m not sure” I’m tired of @uwebristol not addressing the crisis that is period poverty in the UK. Therefore, I, Daisy Wakefield have been forced to take matters into my own hands by supplying FREE sanitary products on all @uwebristol campuses. (Due to funding this with my student loan there is limited supply, so head to your nearest UWE bathroom soon if you are in need).

A post shared by Daisy Wakefield (@daisy_wakefield) on

Announcing her decision on Instagram, Daisy told followers: "After many emails saying 'I’ll get back to you' or 'I’m not sure', I’m tired of @uwebristol not addressing the crisis that is period poverty in the UK. Therefore, I, Daisy Wakefield have been forced to take matters into my own hands by supplying FREE sanitary products on all @uwebristol campuses."

UWE said in response to Daisy's campaign: "Period poverty is a global issue and we're pleased UWE Bristol students are passionately advocating for change. The university does not currently supply free sanitary products on campus, though we would be pleased to meet with students to understand if there is an emerging need for this."

View this post on Instagram

I have had a lot of people me offering to donate money/sanitary products for my campaign, which I am extremely grateful for. However, I have had a long think and as much as I would love to continue supplying free sanitary products for UWE students, it is still a short-term solution for a long-term problem. @uwebristol NEED to now take initiative and recognise from the response this campaign has got that people are in need and @uwebristol students would be eternally grateful for their support. Also the sad reality is I will no longer be a UWE student after July, so I won’t even be able to supply them even if I wanted to. Therefore, I am urgently asking everyone to work together to get @uwebristol to step up ASAP by ing/calling/emailing/tagging them until they show signs of preventing period poverty. Also if you feel inspired please your University/workplace/local MP and ask what they are doing to help prevent period poverty (for a lot of people just opening up the conversation can really make positive change). Additionally, there are some amazing charities out there preventing period poverty such as; @bloodygoodperiod, @everymonthmcr, @nomoretaboo, @theredboxprojectuk, @freedom4girls and many more who would all be extremely grateful for your generosity. Thank you all once again, I am so so grateful for all your support 💛

A post shared by Daisy Wakefield (@daisy_wakefield) on

Since Daisy's post went viral on social media, other students are now working together to tackle the issue - but supplying free tampons is just the start.

After July, Daisy will no longer be a student, so is encouraging people to put pressure on universities, local MPs and workplaces to make supplying period products standard practise.

We salute you.

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